They recognized each other like italics.

jamiejedi:

wittyandcharming:

sheepy-doodle:

ursulavernon:

bogleech:

ceruleancynic:

mmejack:

wittyandcharming:

THESE PARENT BIRDS ARE SO BEAUTIFUL LIKE BIRDY DRAG QUEENS WITH FLAWLESS EYELINER AND THE BABY LOOKS LIKE AN UNFINISHED MUPPET AND I’M DEAD.

These perfectly done up geisha are just so proud of their strange little alien sock puppet.

this picture makes me happy

Every time I see this I think I laugh harder
They really do look so proud
So serious, so dignified as they bask together in the stupid looking lint monster that came out of one of their butts

I love this!



OH MY GOD YOU GUYS

YOU MAY NEVER COMPLAIN ABOUT THIS POST GETTING NOTES AGAIN
View Larger

jamiejedi:

wittyandcharming:

sheepy-doodle:

ursulavernon:

bogleech:

ceruleancynic:

mmejack:

wittyandcharming:

THESE PARENT BIRDS ARE SO BEAUTIFUL LIKE BIRDY DRAG QUEENS WITH FLAWLESS EYELINER AND THE BABY LOOKS LIKE AN UNFINISHED MUPPET AND I’M DEAD.

These perfectly done up geisha are just so proud of their strange little alien sock puppet.

this picture makes me happy

Every time I see this I think I laugh harder

They really do look so proud

So serious, so dignified as they bask together in the stupid looking lint monster that came out of one of their butts

I love this!

OH MY GOD YOU GUYS

YOU MAY NEVER COMPLAIN ABOUT THIS POST GETTING NOTES AGAIN


rhamphotheca:

Olive Ridley Sea Turtles in Baja California!
During the Cabo Cortés Biological Inventory in Baja California, Mexico, conducted by staff of the Herpetology Dept. at the San Diego Natural History Museum, they got to see the work at the local sea turtle refuge.
They observed newly emerged Pacific Ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) and Olive Ridley Sea Turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea). Nests were spotted, protective fencing was put up, and if necessary, nests were relocated.
(via: SDNHM - Herp. Dept.)
rhamphotheca:

Olive Ridley Sea Turtles in Baja California!
During the Cabo Cortés Biological Inventory in Baja California, Mexico, conducted by staff of the Herpetology Dept. at the San Diego Natural History Museum, they got to see the work at the local sea turtle refuge.
They observed newly emerged Pacific Ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) and Olive Ridley Sea Turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea). Nests were spotted, protective fencing was put up, and if necessary, nests were relocated.
(via: SDNHM - Herp. Dept.)
rhamphotheca:

Olive Ridley Sea Turtles in Baja California!
During the Cabo Cortés Biological Inventory in Baja California, Mexico, conducted by staff of the Herpetology Dept. at the San Diego Natural History Museum, they got to see the work at the local sea turtle refuge.
They observed newly emerged Pacific Ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) and Olive Ridley Sea Turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea). Nests were spotted, protective fencing was put up, and if necessary, nests were relocated.
(via: SDNHM - Herp. Dept.)
rhamphotheca:

Olive Ridley Sea Turtles in Baja California!
During the Cabo Cortés Biological Inventory in Baja California, Mexico, conducted by staff of the Herpetology Dept. at the San Diego Natural History Museum, they got to see the work at the local sea turtle refuge.
They observed newly emerged Pacific Ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) and Olive Ridley Sea Turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea). Nests were spotted, protective fencing was put up, and if necessary, nests were relocated.
(via: SDNHM - Herp. Dept.)
rhamphotheca:

Olive Ridley Sea Turtles in Baja California!
During the Cabo Cortés Biological Inventory in Baja California, Mexico, conducted by staff of the Herpetology Dept. at the San Diego Natural History Museum, they got to see the work at the local sea turtle refuge.
They observed newly emerged Pacific Ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) and Olive Ridley Sea Turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea). Nests were spotted, protective fencing was put up, and if necessary, nests were relocated.
(via: SDNHM - Herp. Dept.)
rhamphotheca:

Olive Ridley Sea Turtles in Baja California!
During the Cabo Cortés Biological Inventory in Baja California, Mexico, conducted by staff of the Herpetology Dept. at the San Diego Natural History Museum, they got to see the work at the local sea turtle refuge.
They observed newly emerged Pacific Ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) and Olive Ridley Sea Turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea). Nests were spotted, protective fencing was put up, and if necessary, nests were relocated.
(via: SDNHM - Herp. Dept.)

rhamphotheca:

Olive Ridley Sea Turtles in Baja California!

During the Cabo Cortés Biological Inventory in Baja California, Mexico, conducted by staff of the Herpetology Dept. at the San Diego Natural History Museum, they got to see the work at the local sea turtle refuge.

They observed newly emerged Pacific Ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) and Olive Ridley Sea Turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea). Nests were spotted, protective fencing was put up, and if necessary, nests were relocated.

(via: SDNHM - Herp. Dept.)


pinoy-culture:

Notable People of Filipin@ AncestryApo Maria Whang Od
Apo Whang-Od, who is in her 90’s, is a well known mambabatok, (tattoo artist), and the last one among the Kalinga. However despite what everyone says of her being the last one and when she dies the Kalinga tattooing tradition dies with her, that is false.
She is currently training her young granddaughter (through one of her nieces), Grace Palicas, who is now 17 years old. Her strong interest 7 years go in preserving the tattooing tradition among the Kalinga, a tradition that has died out over years of colonization among the rest of the Philippines especially among the Bisayans who were called the Pintados, “the Painted Ones”, by the Spaniards as they were known to be covered in tattoo’s all over their body, will keep the tradition alive once her lola passes away.
Apo Whang Od is well known to the Filipin@ diaspora, especially toward those interested in tattooing, in particular traditional Filipin@ tattoo’s. Starting from when she was 16, she learned the art from watching her father before her.
Today despite her old age, she still dedicates her life to continuing the tradition, tattooing both other Filipin@’s and foreigners, as well as inspiring a new generation on studying and reviving our old traditional tattooing culture.
Photo Source: [x]
pinoy-culture:

Notable People of Filipin@ AncestryApo Maria Whang Od
Apo Whang-Od, who is in her 90’s, is a well known mambabatok, (tattoo artist), and the last one among the Kalinga. However despite what everyone says of her being the last one and when she dies the Kalinga tattooing tradition dies with her, that is false.
She is currently training her young granddaughter (through one of her nieces), Grace Palicas, who is now 17 years old. Her strong interest 7 years go in preserving the tattooing tradition among the Kalinga, a tradition that has died out over years of colonization among the rest of the Philippines especially among the Bisayans who were called the Pintados, “the Painted Ones”, by the Spaniards as they were known to be covered in tattoo’s all over their body, will keep the tradition alive once her lola passes away.
Apo Whang Od is well known to the Filipin@ diaspora, especially toward those interested in tattooing, in particular traditional Filipin@ tattoo’s. Starting from when she was 16, she learned the art from watching her father before her.
Today despite her old age, she still dedicates her life to continuing the tradition, tattooing both other Filipin@’s and foreigners, as well as inspiring a new generation on studying and reviving our old traditional tattooing culture.
Photo Source: [x]
pinoy-culture:

Notable People of Filipin@ AncestryApo Maria Whang Od
Apo Whang-Od, who is in her 90’s, is a well known mambabatok, (tattoo artist), and the last one among the Kalinga. However despite what everyone says of her being the last one and when she dies the Kalinga tattooing tradition dies with her, that is false.
She is currently training her young granddaughter (through one of her nieces), Grace Palicas, who is now 17 years old. Her strong interest 7 years go in preserving the tattooing tradition among the Kalinga, a tradition that has died out over years of colonization among the rest of the Philippines especially among the Bisayans who were called the Pintados, “the Painted Ones”, by the Spaniards as they were known to be covered in tattoo’s all over their body, will keep the tradition alive once her lola passes away.
Apo Whang Od is well known to the Filipin@ diaspora, especially toward those interested in tattooing, in particular traditional Filipin@ tattoo’s. Starting from when she was 16, she learned the art from watching her father before her.
Today despite her old age, she still dedicates her life to continuing the tradition, tattooing both other Filipin@’s and foreigners, as well as inspiring a new generation on studying and reviving our old traditional tattooing culture.
Photo Source: [x]
pinoy-culture:

Notable People of Filipin@ AncestryApo Maria Whang Od
Apo Whang-Od, who is in her 90’s, is a well known mambabatok, (tattoo artist), and the last one among the Kalinga. However despite what everyone says of her being the last one and when she dies the Kalinga tattooing tradition dies with her, that is false.
She is currently training her young granddaughter (through one of her nieces), Grace Palicas, who is now 17 years old. Her strong interest 7 years go in preserving the tattooing tradition among the Kalinga, a tradition that has died out over years of colonization among the rest of the Philippines especially among the Bisayans who were called the Pintados, “the Painted Ones”, by the Spaniards as they were known to be covered in tattoo’s all over their body, will keep the tradition alive once her lola passes away.
Apo Whang Od is well known to the Filipin@ diaspora, especially toward those interested in tattooing, in particular traditional Filipin@ tattoo’s. Starting from when she was 16, she learned the art from watching her father before her.
Today despite her old age, she still dedicates her life to continuing the tradition, tattooing both other Filipin@’s and foreigners, as well as inspiring a new generation on studying and reviving our old traditional tattooing culture.
Photo Source: [x]
pinoy-culture:

Notable People of Filipin@ AncestryApo Maria Whang Od
Apo Whang-Od, who is in her 90’s, is a well known mambabatok, (tattoo artist), and the last one among the Kalinga. However despite what everyone says of her being the last one and when she dies the Kalinga tattooing tradition dies with her, that is false.
She is currently training her young granddaughter (through one of her nieces), Grace Palicas, who is now 17 years old. Her strong interest 7 years go in preserving the tattooing tradition among the Kalinga, a tradition that has died out over years of colonization among the rest of the Philippines especially among the Bisayans who were called the Pintados, “the Painted Ones”, by the Spaniards as they were known to be covered in tattoo’s all over their body, will keep the tradition alive once her lola passes away.
Apo Whang Od is well known to the Filipin@ diaspora, especially toward those interested in tattooing, in particular traditional Filipin@ tattoo’s. Starting from when she was 16, she learned the art from watching her father before her.
Today despite her old age, she still dedicates her life to continuing the tradition, tattooing both other Filipin@’s and foreigners, as well as inspiring a new generation on studying and reviving our old traditional tattooing culture.
Photo Source: [x]
pinoy-culture:

Notable People of Filipin@ AncestryApo Maria Whang Od
Apo Whang-Od, who is in her 90’s, is a well known mambabatok, (tattoo artist), and the last one among the Kalinga. However despite what everyone says of her being the last one and when she dies the Kalinga tattooing tradition dies with her, that is false.
She is currently training her young granddaughter (through one of her nieces), Grace Palicas, who is now 17 years old. Her strong interest 7 years go in preserving the tattooing tradition among the Kalinga, a tradition that has died out over years of colonization among the rest of the Philippines especially among the Bisayans who were called the Pintados, “the Painted Ones”, by the Spaniards as they were known to be covered in tattoo’s all over their body, will keep the tradition alive once her lola passes away.
Apo Whang Od is well known to the Filipin@ diaspora, especially toward those interested in tattooing, in particular traditional Filipin@ tattoo’s. Starting from when she was 16, she learned the art from watching her father before her.
Today despite her old age, she still dedicates her life to continuing the tradition, tattooing both other Filipin@’s and foreigners, as well as inspiring a new generation on studying and reviving our old traditional tattooing culture.
Photo Source: [x]

pinoy-culture:

Notable People of Filipin@ Ancestry
Apo Maria Whang Od

Apo Whang-Od, who is in her 90’s, is a well known mambabatok, (tattoo artist), and the last one among the Kalinga. However despite what everyone says of her being the last one and when she dies the Kalinga tattooing tradition dies with her, that is false.

She is currently training her young granddaughter (through one of her nieces), Grace Palicas, who is now 17 years old. Her strong interest 7 years go in preserving the tattooing tradition among the Kalinga, a tradition that has died out over years of colonization among the rest of the Philippines especially among the Bisayans who were called the Pintados, “the Painted Ones”, by the Spaniards as they were known to be covered in tattoo’s all over their body, will keep the tradition alive once her lola passes away.

Apo Whang Od is well known to the Filipin@ diaspora, especially toward those interested in tattooing, in particular traditional Filipin@ tattoo’s. Starting from when she was 16, she learned the art from watching her father before her.

Today despite her old age, she still dedicates her life to continuing the tradition, tattooing both other Filipin@’s and foreigners, as well as inspiring a new generation on studying and reviving our old traditional tattooing culture.

Photo Source: [x]


inothernews:

Path of destruction.  This map shows the track of Typhoon Haiyan / Yolanda through the Visayas, the group of islands in the central Philippines.  Comprising more than 7,000 islands, the archipelago is vulnerable to the wind and rain from typhoons, along with the accompanying storm surge.  (The Philippines is also vulnerable to the effects of climate change.)  The dots indicate the height of storm surge, with red indicating waves of more than 3.3 feet; Tacloban is located in the horseshoe-shaped cluster of red dots between the islands of Samar and Leyte on the right of the map.  Other impacted islands include, from right to left, Masbate, Cebu, Negros (both the provinces of Negros Oriental and Negros Occidental), and Panay.  (Illustration via the New York Times)
View Larger

inothernews:

Path of destruction.  This map shows the track of Typhoon Haiyan / Yolanda through the Visayas, the group of islands in the central Philippines.  Comprising more than 7,000 islands, the archipelago is vulnerable to the wind and rain from typhoons, along with the accompanying storm surge.  (The Philippines is also vulnerable to the effects of climate change.)  The dots indicate the height of storm surge, with red indicating waves of more than 3.3 feet; Tacloban is located in the horseshoe-shaped cluster of red dots between the islands of Samar and Leyte on the right of the map.  Other impacted islands include, from right to left, Masbate, Cebu, Negros (both the provinces of Negros Oriental and Negros Occidental), and Panay.  (Illustration via the New York Times)


This... is White Privilege: staff: In a matter of hours on Friday, Typhoon Haiyan completely... →

staff:

In a matter of hours on Friday, Typhoon Haiyan completely devastated parts of the central Philippines. It was one of the strongest storms ever recorded. The death toll is estimated up to 10,000 with hundreds of thousands more displaced. The country has declared a “state of calamity.”


nbcnews:

Typhoon Haiyan’s impact revealed in before-and-after satellite images
(Photos: DigitalGlobe; GIF: Sarah Coffey / NBC News)
Several hours before Typhoon Haiyan made landfall in the Philippines on Nov. 7, DigitalGlobe activated FirstLook, an online service that provides satellite imagery of large scale disasters. Their satellites collected more than 7,300 square miles of imagery in the areas hardest hit by the typhoon — one of the strongest storms to ever make landfall.
See more photos

nbcnews:

Typhoon Haiyan’s impact revealed in before-and-after satellite images

(Photos: DigitalGlobe; GIF: Sarah Coffey / NBC News)

Several hours before Typhoon Haiyan made landfall in the Philippines on Nov. 7, DigitalGlobe activated FirstLook, an online service that provides satellite imagery of large scale disasters. Their satellites collected more than 7,300 square miles of imagery in the areas hardest hit by the typhoon — one of the strongest storms to ever make landfall.

See more photos

(Source: NBCNews.com)